Tuesday, February 26, 2008

The Beauty of Winter



La Pie, 1869 by Claude Monet, Musee d'Orsay, Paris.

A wonderful serene snow-covered landscape, named for the Magpie perched on the fence gate.

8 comments:

GT said...

Painting is the only medium that does snow right. I know this because I tried to pencil it once and...failed. Miserably. What's interesting in an artist's snow landscape is that there's barely any pure white in there, even if it's the first thing that comes to your mind when you think 'snow'. There's blue in there, pink in the sky, brown--it's a secret illusion only artists know about xD

am said...

I've not seen this snow scene by Monet before. Thank you for posting it. A friend of mine used to say that whenever he heard a magpie, it appeared to be saying, "Whaaaaaat?" : o )

fillip said...

Monet. He is surely Rembrandt's only rival as pure painter.

Bill said...

Is it just me, or does it bother anyone else that the bird's shadow is reversed? (His shadow-head is closer to the gatepost that his shadow-tail should be next to, and vice versa.)

am said...

How strange to see this painting posted again with my comments from about a year ago. I clearly remember bill's comment about the bird's shadow being reversed.

Are you doing re-runs?

My friend who always thought magpies were saying "WHAAAAAAAT?" has since had a stroke and can no longer talk, but he can breathe on his own now.

I'll never forget this snowy scene by Monet because I connect it with my friend.

Hope that all is well with you.

Martha said...

yes

am said...

When my friend was a young man, he looked exactly like the young man wearing a straw hat and sitting in the chair in the right foreground of "Luncheon At The Boating Party." The first time I saw that painting, I couldn't have been more startled by the perfect resemblance. It is deeply moving for me to find "La Pie" and "Luncheon" together here. Synchronicity. Thanks so much!

Anonymous said...

Monet's "Le Pie" reminds me of Pissarro's, "Morning Sunlight on the Snow, Eragny-sur-Epte," 1895, the colors of which are warmer than "Le Pie." Both are beautiful.

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