Monday, May 15, 2006

Happy Mother's Day - Yesterday.



The Cradle, 1872 by Berthe Morisot, Musee d'Orsay, Paris.

Morisot was the great-granddaughter of Jean-Honore Fragonard and studied art under her bother-in-law Edouard Manet and later Pierre Auguste Renoir. She exhibited at almost all of the Impressionist exhibitions.

5 comments:

Speechless said...

Berthe Morisot was the first painter who made me notice the nature of her work as a woman. It seems to me that in her work she expresses an understanding of the feminine aspect of life which is very different from so many of the male painters of that era. I've tried to put it into words for years, and the best I can do is say that she seems to see her subjects from a place of internal understanding. It isn't intimacy as much as warmth, compassion getting the reality of the woman's life as something to be lived, not observed. No objectification there.

Speechless said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Martha said...

Second comment was a duplicate.

Robert Merkel said...

I saw this, and a second, much later Morisot, at a wonderful Impressionist exhibition at my local gallery. I preferred the less famous later work (unfortunately, I can't recall what it was called), but they were both amongst the most impressive pieces there, which was saying something given that there were pieces by most of the major Impressionists...

drgns4vr said...

Susan Vreeland's book Life Stories has a short story that features Berthe Morisot. The first half is short stories that touch at least tangentially (is that really a word?) on the lives of several of the Impressionist painters. (The second half of the book was not as specific to modern painters, but more about art and its process.)

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