Friday, March 30, 2007

"Calgon Take Me Away"


Death of Marat by Jacques-Louis David, Musee Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels.

David ushered in a return to classical ideals and away from the Rococo with this homage to the death of his friend. Marat was an outspoken leader of the French Revolution and was murdered in his bath after receiving a letter of admission into his home for the murderer. David's stark scene conveys the shock and sadness he felt after learning Maret had been killed.

13 comments:

harvey said...

A scene in the movie About Schmidt echoes that painting. Screenshots here.

Val Ann C said...

The title of this blog post made me laugh out loud. I really enjoy your site and your eclectic taste in art.

Anonymous said...

Marat.

Martha said...

Boy, that slipped by a lot of people. Thanks.

chittavrtti said...

Thank you for posting this. The Death of Marat is used as the name of a dessert in the book Sunshine by Robin McKinley and I didn't "get it" Now I do :)**CV

Matt said...

This is a duplicate post, too! See the Google cache of May 18, 2006, and again it's not in your May 2006 archive. ??? Not that someone's art history blog is a big deal, but with all this recycling, I'm starting to feel...deceived? :(

Martha said...

Hey - with over 373 original posts I figure I can go into re-runs too. Also, you get what you pay for.

Martha

Anonymous said...

Martha
Keep posting --some of us are new and so it's new to us, and if I see a rerun, that's OK also.

Matt said...

Good point, and now that I think about it, it's nice to be reminded of paintings I've seen before. Sorry for jumping so quickly to making a post like that (but isn't that what the internets are for? ;). Keep up the good work!

Martha said...

Thanks for continuing to visit the site.

Martha

Anonymous said...

still best agit-prop ever

Murr said...

Great site. Marat was in his bath because he suffered from a disgusting and painful skin condition. You can't see that in the picture, however....

Anonymous said...

David's creation of the pose was carefully staged to associate Marat with a martyr's death. This portrait was created for and used for political purposes. The image has far less to do with Marat the man dying (and any grief that might have caused for David) and for more about fanning the flames of political outrage.

Beautiful light and one of the true pinnacles of Neoclassicism. Thanks for posting it.

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