Wednesday, October 19, 2005

Together



Two Trout in a Stream, c.1830 by Ando Hiroshige, Pacific Asia Museum.

Hiroshige is best known for his woodblock prints, but was also a skilled painter and wrote a book on fish.

1 comment:

michele omiccioli said...

In this days in Rome there's an important show sponsored by The Presidency of Italian Republic ... a modern artist of byobu, Tenkei Tachibana ... Fish is curiously a very important symbol both in christian culture and in japanese shintoistic/buddistic one but in an opposite way... it's a metaphor of Christ (in ancient greek the word 'fish' is 'ichthus' an anagram for Iesùs Christòs Theoùs Utèr sotèr - Jesus Christ God's son the saver - ... but it's a single fish, the only fish that count, often dead on a tablecloth, in alternative to the other symbol, the sacrifical lamb, and bread ...

in japanese culture fishes are always more than one, usually, and depicted in their own environment ... a naturalistic prospective that recalls to a latent animistic sensibility of pre-buddism japan, and if in couple they remind to 'ying and yang' philosophy: the fishes sometimes are portrayed like they're swimming in circle, an 'head-tail' spiralic swim...
I suggest a great describer of this way of feeling, Yasunari Kawabata, a poet and noveller of gentle nature, of the falling leaves ... as we all have seen before in O'Keefe's picture ...

PS: Thanks Martha for your visit into my blog. I hope you'll pay a visit some other times, whenever you like!

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