Tuesday, March 04, 2008

Rowing Skill



The Great Wave at Kanagawa (from the series Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji), c.1830-32 by Katsushika Hokusai, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

One of the most famous members of the Ukiyo-e group of printmakers from the Edo period in Japanese Art. Hokusai's work is popular in his native country and was also popular among the 19th century French Impressionists. It continues to be popular throughout the world today and a museum dedicated to his art is in Obuse, Japan.

5 comments:

Speechless said...

The colors of these prints are so inviting. FUnny how they are such stylized representations of world. I suppose the medium demanded letting the detail fall away, but in a way which is very pleasing to the eye.

I have a dear friend who collects Japanese art, prints and textile. He seems to like the everyman aspect of these prints, that they were made to be accessible is a fine virtue, and one that is too easily overlooked.

irina said...

which reminds me of the Japanese poetry called HAIKU... what stamps succeded in paniting, it accomplishes it in words...

Adam Harvey said...

I spent a year in my academic fine arts team in high school studying Japanese art, theatre and music. Hokusai and Hiroshige will always have a special place in my heart. I always try to check out the prints in the Cleveland Museum of Art when I scurry over that way.

Martha said...

Actually the galleries are down at the CMA while they do a total renovation. They probably will be down until 2007 (or later). The museum will host travelling exhibitions during the renovation.

Sita said...

Not only impressionists were imfluenced by Hokusai. In general he inspired the landscape paintings and the well-known whiplash motive of art nouveau looks like the movements of Hukusai's waves... It's very beautiful!

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